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Uprooted – Naomi Novik

Synopsis:

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life.

Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her.

But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

I am so glad that I purchased the audio book version of this novel. Had I not, some of the names would have thrown me.

Agnieszka is the type of character I love to read about. She is clumsy and can not seem to keep herself clean, the epitome of a tom-boy. She is determined and a bit self-righteous, but that always makes for fun character development.

I loved the constant back-and-forth between her and “The Dragon”. He is seen as an all-knowing, all-powerful being, yet she pushes him to see things her way, to do things her way.

I loved the moments they shared while performing mutual magic. The bond between the two continued to grow and develop, even as both fought it.

I am usually not big on romance stories, but the way this one played out left much more story to be explored outside of a budding romance.

The Wood was an amazing aspect of this story. I was intrigued and at times a little terrified at what it represented. I needed to know what this corruption was and where it came from. I needed to see how they planned to vanquish it. With each step they took to combat it and with each new introduction of the forms the corruption could take, I found myself at the edge of my seat.

This novel was a thrilling read from beginning to end. The novel never goes where you expect it to. I love books that keep me guessing.

Quotes:

“If you don’t want a man dead, don’t bludgeon him over the head repeatedly.”
― Naomi NovikUprooted

“What an unequaled gift for disaster you have.”
― Naomi NovikUprooted

“Magic was singing in me, through me; I felt the murmur of his power singing back that same song.”
― Naomi NovikUprooted

Recommendations:

Black Wolves (Black Wolves, #1) by Kate Elliott

Wake of Vultures (The Shadow, #1) by Lila Bowen

The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1) by Maggie Stiefvater

Shadow and Bone (Shadow and Bone, #1) by Leigh Bardugo

 

 
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Posted by on August 2, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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The City Stained Red – Sam Sykes

Synopsis:

Long before he was sent to hell, the Aeon known as Khoth-Kapira was the closest thing to a living god the world had ever known. Possessed of a vast intellect, he pioneered many of the wonders that persist in the world that lingered long after he was banished. Nearly every fragment of medical, economic and technological progress that the mortal races enjoyed could be traced back to him. But with his wonders came cruelty beyond measure: industrialized slavery, horrifying experimentations and a rage that would eventually force the world to bow to him.

Now, as Khoth-Kapira stirs the world begins to shudder with disasters yet to come.The epicenter is the city of Cier’Djaal. A religious war between two unstoppable military juggernauts begins to brew. The racial fury among many peoples of the world is about to explode. Demons begin to pour from the shadows at the head of a vicious cult worshipping dark powers.

And Lenk finds himself in the middle once more, his fate and the fate of Khoth-Kapira interlinked as the demon attempts to convince him of his earnestness.

“Your world is breaking around you,” He Who Makes says, “let me fix it. Let me help you. Let me out.”

Review:

Everything I had read about The City Stained Red, stated that this series could be read apart from Sykes’s original seires. My advice… Don’t. There are things that will be quite confusing at first. They do get fleshed out later on, but I do wish I had taken the time to read some of the one or two star reviews. Then, I would have known this. I disagreee with the one and two star reviews, but they do mention that.

I first heard of Sam Sykes via Twitter. After following him for almost a month, I couldn’t wait to pick up something he’d written. I was not disappointed. His quick wit and humor come across well in his novels. I enjoyed having serious moments broken up by slapstick.

His characters are quite the rag-tag bunch. I enjoyed getting to know them all individually. However, I do wish there would have been mention of perspective change, i.e. chapter titles with new perspective’s name. It broke pace when the first thing written was “she” coming out of a male perspective.

It was interesting seeing a male character driven by motivations mainly left to female characters in the past. Lenk is a hopeless romantic in many ways. His desire to see his world changed and his motivations for doing so were all centered around his lady-love, Kataria. When they are apart, he morns the loss, literally.

I also enjoyed the many and diverse battles going on within the city. It seemed very human to have so much going on. Not one major battle (as is the case with most novels/stories) but many small interspersing prejudices and bigotries. Humans don’t like oids, the different factions of the city don’t get along, the many faith’s argue over their differences. It is a “city stained red” in so many ways.

Quotes:

“A pair of the shirtless men drew back the curtains to expose what appeared to be something between a man, a grub, and a pillow that couldn’t quite make up its mind.”

-Sam Sykes, The City Stained Red

“It’s a demon, Dread. What the hell are you hoping to do to it?’

He closed his eyes, drew in a deep breath.

‘Oh, you know.’

When he opened them, they were alive with bright red light.

‘Stuff.”

– Sam Sykes, The City Stained Red

“And a certain level of nonchalance was required ot the woman who may or may not have just inadvertently started a war.”

– Sam Sykes, The City Stained Red

Recommendations:

Black Wolves – Kate Elliot

Beyond Redemption – Michael R. Fletcher

Prince of Thorns – Mark Lawrence

The Blade Itself – Joe Abercrombie

 
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Posted by on July 19, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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Zero World – Jason M. Hough

Synopsis:

Hough returns with a riveting near-future spy thriller that combines the adrenaline of a high-octane James Bond adventure with mind-blowing sci-fi speculations worthy of Christopher Nolan’s Inception.

Technologically enhanced superspy Peter Caswell has been dispatched on a top-secret assignment unlike any he’s ever faced. A spaceship that vanished years ago has been found, along with the bodies of its murdered crew—save one. Peter’s mission is to find the missing crew member, who fled through what appears to be a tear in the fabric of space. Beyond this mysterious doorway lies an even more confounding reality: a world that seems to be Earth’s twin.

Peter discovers that this mirrored world is indeed different from his home, and far more dangerous. Cut off from all support, and with only days to complete his operation, Peter must track his quarry alone on an alien world. But he’s unprepared for what awaits on the planet’s surface, where his skills will be put to the ultimate test—and everything he knows about the universe will be challenged in ways he never could have imagined.

Review:

I had not heard of Jason M. Hough until I attended a writer’s conference and sat in on a class of his. During the conference my friend and I kept razzing him about his N7 jacket, calling him Commander Shepard the whole weekend. But that’s another story… His action class had me intrigued. While I didn’t purchase any novels at the conference, I came home and started looking for them on Amazon. I found that Zero World, the audio version, was performed by none other than Gideon Emery. So, naturally, I couldn’t wait to have Fenris himself reading to me.

While Gideon’s performance was amazing, he had some great material to work with.

Immediately, Hough throws you into the action. Caswell is explaining what makes him so special. He walks you through the process of reversion. It is intense. I was so enthralled through the entire book that my husband couldn’t get my attention. At one point, I was laughing hysterically, to the point he started laughing with me.

The intrigue of this novel climbs to the very last page. There is no stopping point. Hough writes in a way that you simply can’t set the novel aside. You NEED to know what will happen next.

His characters are all likeable. Peter and Melnie (*sp, sorry audio book, don’t know if this is correct) in particular. They play off of each other so well. Both are quick witted and highly intelligent. Neither are ready to take anything at face value.

This novel has many twists and turns. Hough always keeps the reader guessing. Just when you think you have it all figured out, he throws something new and unexpected into the mix.

My only hope is that their story continues. I was able to Tweet him and he did say “nothing concrete” as of now. *sigh*

I had no way to bookmark quotes, due to the fact this was an audiobook. :/

Recommendations:

Seveneves – Neal Stephenson

Artemis – Andy Weir

The Darwin Elevator – Jason M. Hough

 
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Posted by on July 18, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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The Legion of Flame – Anthony Ryan

Synopsis:

For centuries, the vast Ironship Trading Syndicate relied on drake blood–and the extraordinary powers it confers to those known as the Blood-blessed–to fuel and protect its empire. But now, a fearsome power has arisen–a drake so mighty that the world will tremble before it.

Rogue Blood-blessed Claydon Torcreek, Syndicate agent Lizanne Lethridge, and ironship captain Corrick Hilemore embark upon perilous quests to chase down clues that offer faint hopes of salvation. As the world burns around them, and the fires of revolution are ignited, these few are the last hope for the empire and for all of civilization.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

I sat down to read this novel directly on the heels of the first. I fully expected to love this novel because I had fallen in love with the characters the first-go-round. However, Anthony Ryan gave these characters even more depth and an even bigger story than I had anticipated. 

In book one, we are left with Claydon’s vision as our map for coming events. He meets up with Hilemore and they set off on a journey to save the world. Without giving spoilers, I love how the endings of both novels paralleled each other. It gave me an elevated sense of anticipation for the next novel.

Lizanne’s story takes a seriously unanticipated turn. We get to see her use every skill she has. She proves why she has been selected for missions of highest importance. She has become one of my favorite characters of all time.

The additions of Sirus’ viewpoint was a fantastic addition. It honestly reminded me of Dragon Age’s darkspawn/Archdemon storyline, with the added benefit of seeing the story from the darkspawn’s perspective. I do have to say, I was thrown by his addition at first, but after I realized why he was added it, I truly enjoyed it.

I did not think any fantasy novel was capable of the epic scope and fantastic storyline of Vaelin’s intro novel, Blood Song, but I believe Anthony Ryan has outdone himself. I laughed. I cried. I took this book everywhere I went. 

When does the next one come out again? (Not soon enough)

Quotes:

“On behalf of those not born into a life of useless indolence, I bid you welcome to adulthood.”

– Anthony Ryan, The Legion of Flame

I sense our drake god isn’t altogether happy with today’s butcher’s bill.”

 Anthony Ryan, The Legion of Flame

Recommendations:

The Black Prism – Brent Weeks

Malice – John Gwynne

Age of Myth – Michael J. Sullivan

The Name of the Wind – Patrick Rothfuss

 
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Posted by on July 5, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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Give These A Listen

Audiobooks are becoming ever more popular, with a growing list of excellent performers, it’s not hard to see why. I have come across many of my favorite voices, be it from video games or celebrities, taking on the task of letting us listen to their voices for hours. Here are some you should give a try.

This is a fast-paced, edge-of-your-seat, sci-fi novel. Assassins, space travel and a James Bond-esque feel make this novel worth your time. Another bonus, it is narrated by Gideon Emery. (Fenris himself, if you are a Dragon Age fan). His voice is so rich and his performance is phenomenal.

Purchase here.

Another great delivery by Steven Brand. Anthony Ryan’s new series will have you hypnotized as you are lead on an adventure through drake infested lands, naval battles and political intrigue. 

Purchase here.

Having trouble tackling the massive tomes of The Stormlight Archive? Do what I did. Switch between book and audio book. I have found this helps me when I want to set a book aside due to sheer volume. Brandon Sanderson is one of the best fantasy writers out there. His books deserve a spot on your shelf. Don’t let this series slip by just because you feel you can not devote such time to a novel (or series). 

Purchase here.

Here is another performance by Kate Reading. She is a popular voice within the fantasy genre. Her performance lends a great deal to each novel she narrates. 

Purchase here.
Happy reading, or listening 😉

 
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Posted by on June 21, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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In the Company of the Dead – Ciara Ballintyne

Synopsis:

Only a fool crosses a god, but Ellaeva and Lyram will do anything to get what they want.

Chosen as a five-year-old orphan to be the Left Hand of Death, Ellaeva has nothing to call her own—nothing except a desire to avenge her murdered parents. Her duties leave her no time to pursue the man responsible, until both her work and revenge lead to the same place—the lonely castle where Lyram Aharris is serving out his exile for striking his prince.

Lyram is third in line for the throne, and when the castle is unexpectedly besieged, he fears his prince means to remove him from contention for the crown permanently. Ellaeva’s arrival brings hope, until she reveals she has not come for the siege, but instead she hunts the castle for a hidden necromancer dedicated to the dark god of decay.

Within their stone prison, Ellaeva and Lyram must fight to save themselves from political machinations and clashing gods. But as the siege lengthens, the greatest threat comes from an unexpected quarter.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

So, let me start this review by saying, I do not like when a romance takes over the plot of a fantasy novel. It drives me crazy. I feel like, if this is the case, it should at least be in the synopsis so I don’t waste my time. However, this novel gave me enough action to keep going.

I absolutely loved Lyram’s story. His exile, the betrayal, the political intrigue, all were done quite well. I also loved his character. He is everything you expect of a military man, duty, honor, sacrifice. He is kind and loyal. He does let past hurts (and that’s putting it lightly) get in the way of his motivations at times, but he remains just in doing so.

I adore a strong female character, but Ellaeva fell a bit short for me. While she endures many hardships, there were times I couldn’t even feel sorry for her. She became a product of circumstance and that made her less than heroic. At times I began to feel as if she were a petulant adolescent. Or, simply, a stereotypical female. That being said, I did like her, just not as much as I had hoped. 

The one thing that stood above all else in this story (and may have brought a tear, or two, to my eye) was the profound relationships between Lyram and his advisors. These men knew the army commander and the exile and still they followed him without hesitation. They adored him and he them. 

While the entirety of this novel lays on the plot of one siege, the story flows well and has enough background to keep the reader immersed. She fleshes out the characters through examination of circumstance. I enjoyed learning about the character’s pasts while the story played out.

No Quotes, NetGalley ARC

Recommendations:

A Discovery of Witches – Deborah Harkness

Dark Witch – Nora Roberts

Lord of Snow and Shadows – Sara Ash

Daughter of the Blood – Anne Bishop


 
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Posted by on June 17, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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Truthwitch – Susan Dennard

Synopsis:

In a continent on the edge of war, two witches hold its fate in their hands.

Young witches Safiya and Iseult have a habit of finding trouble. After clashing with a powerful Guildmaster and his ruthless Bloodwitch bodyguard, the friends are forced to flee their home.

Safi must avoid capture at all costs as she’s a rare Truthwitch, able to discern truth from lies. Many would kill for her magic, so Safi must keep it hidden – lest she be used in the struggle between empires. And Iseult’s true powers are hidden even from herself.

In a chance encounter at Court, Safi meets Prince Merik and makes him a reluctant ally. However, his help may not slow down the Bloodwitch now hot on the girls’ heels. All Safi and Iseult want is their freedom, but danger lies ahead. With war coming, treaties breaking and a magical contagion sweeping the land, the friends will have to fight emperors and mercenaries alike. For some will stop at nothing to get their hands on a Truthwitch.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

I was reluctant to pick up this novel, simply because there was SO much hype surrounding it. The last few I’ve done that with turned out to be… Let’s just say, not to my taste. I held onto it for a while as it stared at me from the bookshelf. I’d read another rave review and it would scream “See, see, just pick me up!” My fingers would reach for it and then my brain would scream, “No, don’t do this to yourself again.” But, finally, I gave in.

So, I’m about 40 or so pages in and a little light goes off in my head. These names, certain phrases, they all reminded me of something. Within moments it dawned on me, Dragon Age. This woman is a fan. 

Don’t get me wrong this book is not a Dragon Age fan-fic, nor is it set in the Dragon Age world. I just knew in that moment I was faced with the work of a kindred spirit.

I love how brilliantly these characters intertwine. The twists and turns are carefully woven together. Susan Dennard became a Threadwitch herself with the creation of this novel. Pulling people in and placing them directly in line with one another, throwing them into chaos and seeing the threads change and form. 

I feel like this was an expose on how to weave a story properly. 

Excellent, in every aspect!

Side Note: After finishing this novel, I read Windwitch the next day. I can’t wait for the release of Bloodwitch!

Quotes:

“I hate this. Both the storm and the plan. Why does it have to be ‘we’? Why not just me?”
“Because ‘just me’ isn’t who we are,” Iseult hollered back. “I’ll always follow you, Safi, and you’ll always follow me. Threadsisters to the end.” 
― Susan DennardTruthwitch

“It was the circle of perfect motion. Of the light-bringer and dark-giver, the world-starter and shadow-ender. Of initiation and completion. It was the symbol of the Cahr Awen. Cahr Awen.” 
― Susan DennardTruthwitch
“Who the rut is that Nubrevnan Windwitch? And: He should really learn how to button a shirt.” 
― Susan DennardTruthwitch
” How is that for service? Do you know how many men onboard would kill for the use of a spoon?”
“And do you know,” she retorted, “how many men I can killwith a spoon?” 
― Susan DennardTruthwitch
Recommendations:

Graceling – Kristin Cashore

Daughter of Smoke and Bone – Laini Taylor

Six of Crows – Leigh Bardugo

The Iron King – Julie Kagawa

 
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Posted by on May 31, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

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