RSS

Invite Some Magic into Your Life – Fae Reads

I was online the other day and found quite a few people asking about recommendations for books about Fae, dark fae, etc. So, I thought I would make a list of the ones I have enjoyed.

The Fae have called to me for as long as I have been a reader and I am a sucker for a good Fae story, so I hope you find something in this list that brings you joy. There will be a variety of writing styles and reading levels, along with some that venture into darker themes or erotica. But there will also be those that are Young Adult and light.

The Iron Fey series – Julie Kagawa

Something has always felt slightly off in Meghan’s life, ever since her father disappeared before her eyes when she was six. She has never quite fit in at school or at home.

When a dark stranger begins watching her from afar, and her prankster best friend becomes strangely protective of her, Meghan senses that everything she’s known is about to change.

But she could never have guessed the truth – that she is the daughter of a mythical faery king and is a pawn in a deadly war. Now Meghan will learn just how far she’ll go to save someone she cares about, to stop a mysterious evil, no faery creature dare face; and to find love with a young prince who might rather see her dead than let her touch his icy heart. 

Merry Gentry series – Laurell K. Hamilton

My name is Meredith ‘Merry’ Gentry, but of course it’s not my real name. I dare not even whisper my true name after dark for fear that one hushed word will travel over the night winds to the soft ear of my aunt, the Queen of Air and Darkness. She wants me dead. I don’t even know why…

I fled the high court of Faerie three years ago and have been in hiding ever since. As Merry Gentry, I am a private investigator for the Grey Detective Agency: Supernatural Problems, Magical Solutions. My magical skills, scorned at the courts of Faerie, are valued in the human world. Even by human standards, my magic isn’t flashy, which is fine by me. Flashy attracts attention and I can’t afford that.

Rumour has it that I am dead. Not quite. I am Princess Meredith NicEssus. To speak that name after dark is to call down a knock upon your door from a hand that can kill you with a touch. I have been careful, but not careful enough. The shadows have found me, and they are going to take me back home, one way or another.

So the running is over. But the fighting has just begun…

Rich, sensual, brimming with dangerous magic, A Kiss of Shadows is a dazzling tour-de-force where folklore, fantasy and erotically charged adventure collide.

Wicked Lovely series – Melissa Marr

Rule #3: Don’t stare at invisible faeries.
Aislinn has always seen faeries. Powerful and dangerous, they walk hidden in the mortal world. Aislinn fears their cruelty – especially if they learn of her Sight – and wishes she were as blind to their presence as other teens.

Rule #2: Don’t speak to invisible faeries.
Now faeries are stalking her. One of them, Keenan, who is equal parts terrifying and alluring, is trying to talk to her, asking questions Aislinn is afraid to answer.

Rule #1: Don’t ever attract their attention.
But it’s too late. Keenan is the Summer King, who has sought his queen for nine centuries. Without her, summer itself will perish. He is determined that Aislinn will become the Summer Queen at any cost — regardless of her plans or desires.

Suddenly none of the rules that have kept Aislinn safe are working anymore, and everything is on the line: her freedom; her best friend, Seth; her life; everything.

Faery intrigue, mortal love, and the clash of ancient rules and modern expectations swirl together in Melissa Marr’s stunning twenty-first-century faery tale.

October Daye series – Seanan McGuire

October “Toby” Daye, a changeling who is half human and half fae, has been an outsider from birth. After getting burned by both sides of her heritage, Toby has denied the Faerie world, retreating to a “normal” life. Unfortunately for her, the Faerie world has other ideas…

The murder of Countess Evening Winterrose pulls Toby back into the fae world. Unable to resist Evening’s dying curse, which binds her to investigate, Toby must resume her former position as knight errant and renew old alliances. As she steps back into fae society, dealing with a cast of characters not entirely good or evil, she realizes that more than her own life will be forfeited if she cannot find Evening’s killer. 

Modern Faerie Tales – Holly Black

Sixteen-year-old Kaye is a modern nomad. Fierce and independent, she travels from city to city with her mother’s rock band until an ominous attack forces Kaye back to her childhood home. There, amid the industrial, blue-collar New Jersey backdrop, Kaye soon finds herself an unwilling pawn in an ancient power struggle between two rival faerie kingdoms – a struggle that could very well mean her death.

Fever series – Karen Marie Moning

“My name is MacKayla, Mac for short. I’m a sidhe-seer, one who sees the Fae, a fact I accepted only recently and very reluctantly.

My philosophy is pretty simple – any day nobody’s trying to kill me is a good day in my book. I haven’t had many good days lately. Not since the walls between Man and Fae came down. But then, there’s not a sidhe-seer alive who’s had a good day since then.”

When MacKayla’s sister was murdered, she left a single clue to her death, a cryptic message on Mac’s cell phone. Journeying to Ireland in search of answers, Mac is soon faced with an even greater challenge: staying alive long enough to master a power she had no idea she possessed – a gift that allows her to see beyond the world of man, into the dangerous realm of the Fae.

As Mac delves deeper into the mystery of her sister’s death, her every move is shadowed by the dark, mysterious Jericho…while at the same time, the ruthless V’lane – an alpha Fae who makes sex an addiction for human women – closes in on her. As the boundary between worlds begins to crumble, Mac’s true mission becomes clear: to find the elusive Sinsar Dubh before someone else claims the all-powerful Dark Book – because whoever gets to it first holds nothing less than complete control both worlds in their hands.

The Split Worlds – Emma Newman

The new season is starting and the Master of Ceremonies is missing. Max, an Arbiter of the Split Worlds Treaty, is assigned with the task of finding him with no one to help but a dislocated soul and a mad sorcerer.

There is a witness but his memories have been bound by magical chains only the enemy can break. A rebellious woman trying to escape her family may prove to be the ally Max needs.

But can she be trusted? And why does she want to give up eternal youth and the life of privilege she’s been born into?

Indigo Court series – Yasmine Galenorn

Eons ago, vampires tried to turn the Dark Fae in order to harness their magic, only to create a demonic enemy more powerful than they imagined. Now Myst, the Vampiric Fae Queen of the Indigo Court, has enough power to begin a long prophesied supernatural war. And Cicely Waters, a witch who can control the wind, may be the only one who can stop her-and save her beloved Fae prince from the Queen’s enslavement.

Cicely Waters, a witch who can control the wind, has returned home to New Forest, Washington, after learning that her family is in danger. The Indigo Court holds the city in fear. People are vanishing, and strange deaths plague the town. And when she is swept into an unexpected and passionate reunion with Grieve, the Fae prince who taught her how to harness the wind, Cicely finds herself with a fierce and territorial lover.

But Greive has been enslaved in Myst’s court, and now, caught betwen two evils, the lovers must survive the machinations of the Vampiric Fae queen, even as Cicely untangles the hidden secrets to her own heritage.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 4, 2020 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Nevernight – Jay Kristoff

Synopsis:

In a land where three suns almost never set, a fledgling killer joins a school of assassins, seeking vengeance against the powers who destroyed her family.

Daughter of an executed traitor, Mia Corvere is barely able to escape her father’s failed rebellion with her life. Alone and friendless, she hides in a city built from the bones of a dead god, hunted by the Senate and her father’s former comrades. But her gift for speaking with the shadows leads her to the door of a retired killer, and a future she never imagined.

Now, Mia is apprenticed to the deadliest flock of assassins in the entire Republic—the Red Church. If she bests her fellow students in contests of steel, poison and the subtle arts, she’ll be inducted among the Blades of the Lady of Blessed Murder, and one step closer to the vengeance she desires. But a killer is loose within the Church’s halls, the bloody secrets of Mia’s past return to haunt her, and a plot to bring down the entire congregation is unfolding in the shadows she so loves.

Will she even survive to initiation, let alone have her revenge?

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

My initial reaction to the first chapter of this book was absolute and complete confusion. Rarely do I read a novel for artistry, or technique. I want nothing more than a good story. When it becomes convoluted or confusing, I lose interest quickly. However, this is where the smashing reviews of this book saved it, in my eyes. I wanted to push through, wanted to see why so many people loved these books.

I am happy that I did.

The non-linear timeline, the flashbacks, and the moments of Mia thinking ‘outside of herself’ broke the pacing of this novel for me. While I was willing to push through, I still found it to be quite annoying. Other than that, the rest of the novel was well written.

I found myself more intrigued by the people around Mia, than Mia herself. I’m not entirely sure why. Mia’s backstory didn’t pack the punch it could have, had the story played out in a linear aspect. Our introduction to her is her first time having sex, alongside her first assassination. While the parallels were fun, it did nothing to endear me to the character.

What kept me going with Mia was her audacity. She is fearless but not from any deep seeded inner strength. No, she actually has a being that follows her around eating her fear. This is the only interesting thing about the girl. I do hate to say that but there really isn’t much to like or dislike about her. She remains static over the course of the novel without any emotional connection to the reader.

What I was completely impressed with was the SMUT! I know this is something that seems out of place outside a fanfiction review but, lads, take note. There is a reason many women read fanfiction as opposed to novels these days. And there is a huge reason that women won’t buy female characters written by men. It is the smut. Every time, this is where male authors lose us. Kristoff managed to appeal to my senses, to intrigue me to continue reading.

After getting through one third of the book, I did become more wrapped up in the story than I had been and found it hard to put down. I am interested to see if these novels will lead us down the heroine’s journey or if these novels will stand alone. I am somewhat hoping for more of a heroine’s journey, just to be able to connect with Mia’s character a bit more.

Qutoes:

“The books we love, they love us back. And just as we mark our places in the pages, those pages leave their marks on us. I can see it in you, sure as I see it in me. You’re a daughter of the words. A girl with a story to tell.”
― Jay Kristoff, Nevernight

“Iron or glass? they’d ask.
She was neither.
She was steel.”
― Jay Kristoff, Nevernight

“Cock is just another word for ‘fool.’ But you call someone a cunt, well…” The girl smiled. “You’re implying a sense of malice there. An intent. Malevolent and self-aware. Don’t think I name Consul Scaeva a cunt to gift him insult. Cunts have brains, Don Tric. Cunts have teeth. Someone calls you a cunt, you take it as a compliment. As a sign that folks believe you’re not to be lightly fucked with.”
― Jay Kristoff, Nevernight

Recommendations:

A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon

Red Sister by Mark Lawrence

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 3, 2020 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Wolf’s Call – Anthony Ryan

Synopsis:

PEACE NEVER LASTS

Vaelin Al Sorna is a living legend, his name known across the Realm. It was his leadership that overthrew empires, his blade that won hard-fought battles – and his sacrifice that defeated an evil more terrifying than anything the world had ever seen. Yet he cast aside his earned glory for a quiet life in the Realm’s northern reaches.

Now, whispers have come from across the sea of an army called the Steel Horde, led by a man who believes himself a god. Vaelin has no wish to fight another war, but when he learns that Sherin, the woman he lost long ago, has fallen into the Horde’s grasp, he resolves to confront this powerful new threat.

To this end, Vaelin travels to the realms of the Merchant Kings, a land ruled by honour and intrigue. There, as the drums of war thunder across kingdoms riven by conflict, Vaelin learns a terrible truth: that there are some battles that even he cannot hope to win.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

*Spoilers for Blood Song and the Raven’s Shadow Trilogy*

I feel like I have said this a thousand times but Anthony Ryan is by far my favorite fantasy author. The reason for this started with Blood Song, Vaelin Al Sorna’s intro novel. To return to his world is quite nostalgic for me.

Vaelin has settled down and leads a rather quiet life as Tower Lord. He’s become a mentor and his former allies have dispersed. This doesn’t mean that Vaelin has grown soft. In fact, the intro to this novel leads us on a hunt for bandits that have had the audacity to set up camp near his tower.

As we all know, Vaelin has lost his song. He gave it up to fight his former enemies. Yet, when new horrors arise, he knows he can no longer match them. His song was what had made him the warrior of legend. This doesn’t stop the need in him to track down the love of his life, the woman he sent away to save her.

While we are given a bevy of new characters and enemies in this trilogy, there are quite a few returning characters. Some have lost their way since leaving Vaelin and some are just as amazing as they ever were. Ryan still holds on to his knack for writing amazing female characters. Recently, I read an article asking why we never see “scoundrel, strong female characters” and I had to laugh. While, his female characters don’t always fall into this category, there are a few moments throughout where you have to realize, yes, they indeed fit this description.

The emotional connection to the characters is another thing that Ryan excels at. I have gone on and on about his descriptions being deliberate rather than superfluous. But, I have neglected to mention how deliberate his timing and execution of emotional moments are. This novel is a stellar example of this. Most is born from nostalgia but there is no denying the emotional pull of this story.

AND THE ENDING!!! Ryan is known for giving us clean endings, even though they are cliffhangers but my friends, this is the cliffhanger from hell!! Could I say that it’s an ending you see coming? Yes. Was I extremely excited? Yes. Am I eagerly anticipating the next novel? More than you can imagine. However, I am not okay. The ending of this novel sets you up for the WORST book hangover in history. I was screaming and dancing around my house, only to realize there was only one page left!!!

No Quotes due to the fact that I couldn’t bookmark the audio-book.

Recommendations:

Blackwing by Ed McDonald

Malice by John Gwynne

The Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks

Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 28, 2020 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , ,

A Plague of Giants – Kevin Hearne

Synopsis:

MOTHER AND WARRIOR
Tallynd is a soldier who has already survived her toughest battle: losing her husband. But now she finds herself on the front lines of an invasion of giants, intent on wiping out the entire kingdom, including Tallynd’s two sons—all that she has left. The stakes have never been higher. If Tallynd fails, her boys may never become men.
SCHOLAR AND SPY
Dervan is a historian who longs for a simple, quiet life. But he’s drawn into intrigue when he’s hired to record the tales of a mysterious bard who may be a spy or even an assassin for a rival kingdom. As the bard shares his fantastical stories, Dervan makes a shocking discovery: He may have a connection to the tales, one that will bring his own secrets to light.
REBEL AND HERO
Abhi’s family have always been hunters, but Abhi wants to choose a different life for himself. Embarking on a journey of self-discovery, Abhi soon learns that his destiny is far greater than he imagined: a powerful new magic thrust upon him may hold the key to defeating the giants once and for all—if it doesn’t destroy him first.
Set in a magical world of terror and wonder, this novel is a deeply felt epic of courage and war, in which the fates of these characters intertwine—and where ordinary people become heroes, and their lives become legend.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

Kevin Hearne became a staple in the fantasy genre with his series, The Iron Druid Chronicles. Not surprising when you crack open the pages and find these brilliantly thought out worlds and magic systems.

In this series, readers get the pleasure of a Chaucer-like narration. I was only about fifty pages into the story before I was telling everyone I knew about it. The delivery from the bard, the retelling of stories done with magical influence, is phenomenal. In each rendition, each new perspective, we are given bits and pieces of the story before it coalesces into a whole. This would usually bother me, to the point I am more likely to set the book aside. However, each character had their own voice and such a wonderful story to tell. Even the bards tale comes full circle.

I also enjoyed the different cultures present in the story. It was truly intriguing to delve into the histories and magics (kennings) of each people and how they came into power varied from nation to nation, kenning to kenning.

As far as female leads go, there wasn’t a huge presence that pulled me in. While there are some great female characters in this novel, none of them really took center stage for me. I was not completely upset by this because what female characters were present, were also extremely well written.

Quotes:

“There is heroism to be found in great battles, it is true; warriors with stable knees who fight and know that they will die for an idea or for the safety of loved ones back home. But there are also people who spend their entire adulthood at a soulless job they despise to make sure their children have something to eat that night so that one day those kids may lead better, more fulfilling lives than their parents. The warrior and the worker both make sacrifices. Who, then, is more heroic? Can any of us judge? I don’t think I’m qualified. I’ll let history decide. But I do not think we should leave it all up to warriors and rulers to speak to the future.”
― Kevin Hearne, A Plague of Giants

“He thought in silence before answering. “I don’t think loneliness is a thing that can be borne: it’s so heavy and crushing for something that is essentially emptiness. It’s like being trapped beneath a boulder, this immovable weight that presses your ribs and slowly steals your breath. And so it must simply be endured, and you do that by looking away. I hope you will not be offended if I admit that I am looking away right now. Every minute she’s out of my sight, I am looking away. But never fear—that boulder of crushing emptiness will still be there when you look back.”
― Kevin Hearne, A Plague of Giants

Recommendations:

Something from the Nightside by  Simon R. Green

A Kiss Before the Apocalypse (Remy Chandler, #1) by Thomas E. Sniegoski

Furies of Calderon by Jim Butcher

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 25, 2020 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , ,

Between Two Thorns – Emma Newman

Synopsis:
The new season is starting and the Master of Ceremonies is missing. Max, an Arbiter of the Split Worlds Treaty, is assigned with the task of finding him with no one to help but a dislocated soul and a mad sorcerer.

There is a witness but his memories have been bound by magical chains only the enemy can break. A rebellious woman trying to escape her family may prove to be the ally Max needs.

But can she be trusted? And why does she want to give up eternal youth and the life of privilege she’s been born into?

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

Okay, first off, can we take a moment to appreciate how beautiful this book is? The cover art is definitely what initially caught my attention.

Second, I am a sucker for ANYTHING Fae. So, naturally, when I read that we were getting the Fae realm in a Victorian society setting… swoon!

I love the initial setup of this novel. Right from the start little nuggets of deceit are dropping, creating a trail you feel the need to follow. Who are these people? What just happened? Did a faerie just do that? The intrigue builds and builds giving you moments where you just have to know what is going to happen next.

The idea of the “split worlds” is also very well done. You aren’t just given glimpses of each one. The main character is literally thrown into all three realms and spends time in each one, giving the reader an amazing picture and world to imagine.

Cathy’s introduction is gripping, as well. We quickly learn that she is no run-of-the-mill human and all the drama begins to unfold as quickly as chapter four. (Minor spoiler)

I loved how Newman kept me on my toes, giving just enough information to need to know what the next little, or sometimes big, detail would be. What little insight were we going to be able to glean from the next chapter? Who was going to be involved?

And oh, be still my heart, a cliffhanger of an ending. We know what’s happening, sure, but why?!? I need the next book!! (Oh. Duh. That’s why 😂😂)

Memorable Quotes:

“Dealing with her family wasn’t as bad as facing aliens with acid for blood, but the were still an unavoidable horror.” – Emma Newman, Between Two Thorns

“She wanted to play Mass Effect and eat chocolate and forget about it all, just for a few hours.” – Emma Newman, Between Two Thorns

Recommendations:

The Iron King – Julie Kagawa

Wicked Lovely – Melissa Marr

The Cruel Prince – Holly Black

Soulless – Gail Carriger

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 27, 2019 in Book Reviews

 

Blackwing – Ed McDonald

33916060

Synopsis:

Set on the ragged edge of a postapocalyptic frontier, Blackwing is a gritty fantasy debut about a man’s desperate battle to survive his own dark destiny…

Nothing in the Misery lasts…

Under a cracked and wailing sky, the Misery is a vast and blighted expanse, created when the Engine, the most powerful weapon in the world, was unleashed against the immortal Deep Kings. Across the wasteland, teeming with corrupted magic and malevolent wraiths, the Deep Kings and their armies are still watching—and still waiting.

Ryhalt Galharrow is no stranger to the Misery. The bounty hunter journeys to a remote outpost, armed for killing both men and monsters, and searching for a mysterious noblewoman. He finds himself in the middle of a shocking attack by the Deep Kings, one that should not be possible. Only a fearsome show of power from the very woman he is seeking saves him.

Once, long ago, he knew the woman well, and together they stumble onto a web of conspiracy that threatens to unmake everything they hold dear and end the fragile peace the Engine has provided. Galharrow is not ready for the truth about the blood he’s spilled and the gods he’s supposed to serve…

Copied from Goodreads
Review:
Galharrow is the ultimate anti-hero. He is a take no shit, hold no punches kind of guy, who realizes he is going to have to do something to save his people. His gritty personality, coupled with his determination, make him one of the most likable characters I have read to date.
The Misery… I am just going to say this… Can we PLEASE have a movie? Pretty please.
McDonald’s description of this world is amazing. I could picture each nuance in his landscapes from blades of grass that were as sharp as glass to mazes of ruts blown into the surface of the world.
His creativity blew my mind. The Deep Kings, the monsters he presented, the way magic is filtered through the moonlight.
This is easily one of the best novels I have ever read. I am thrilled this book has a #1 because that means there is more!
Quotes:
“I saw you stand,” I said. “Saw your courage, back at Twelve. Saw the steel in your will, the power you command. You say there’s nothing of woman about you? You aren’t some painted vase, delicate and useless. You’re a fucking lioness. The strongest damn thing that ever lived. There’s nothing of you but woman.”
“The world is a cruel mother, a matron of darkness, selfishness, greed, and misery. For most, their time suckling at her breast is naught but a scramble through stinging, tearing briars before a naked, shameful collapse as the flesh gives out. And yet in the bright eyes of every newborn, there lies a spark, a potential for goodness, the possibility of a life worth living. That spark deserves its chance. And though most of them will turn out to be as worthless as the parents who sired them, while the cruelty of the earth will tell them to release their innocence and join in the drawing of daggers, every now and then one manages to clutch to its beauty and refuses to release it into the dark.”  ― Ed McDonaldBlackwing
Recommendations:
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 20, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stealing Snow – Danielle Paige

28260524

Synopsis:

Seventeen-year-old Snow has spent her life locked in Whittaker Psychiatric—but she isn’t crazy. And that’s not the worst of it. Her very first kiss proves anything but innocent…when Bale, her only love, turns violent.

Despite Snow knowing that Bale would never truly hurt her, he is taken away—dashing her last hope for any sort of future in the mental ward she calls home. With nowhere else to turn, Snow finds herself drawn to a strange new orderly who whispers secrets in the night about a mysterious past and a kingdom that’s hers for the taking—if only she can find her way past the iron gates to the Tree that has been haunting her dreams.

Beyond the Tree lies Algid, a land far away from the real world, frozen by a ruthless king. And there too await the River Witch, a village boy named Kai, the charming thief Jagger, and a prophecy that Snow will save them all.

Copied from Goodreads.

Review:

This is a retelling of The Snow Queen, by Hans Christian Andersen.

I absolutely loved the beginning of this novel. It opens up in a mental institution, where Snow dubs the medication she is taking, her dwarves. Each medication she is given has a certain effect, even with one she is slightly allergic to and makes her sneeze. It was a great twist to the tale.

The innocence of Snow in this novel isn’t as pure in this retelling. While most have Snow with a sweet disposition and sheer gullibility, Paige gives us a harder, more jaded Snow. She is innocent of the world but harbors inner demons. I think this gives readers a more believable character, or maybe, a more relateable character.

As with most fairy tales, romance takes center stage in this retelling. Snow doesn’t even know the world of her past exists, until her beloved Bale is pulled through a magical mirror and into another realm. The same night a stranger appears in her bedroom, telling her where Bale has gone. She follows this strangers instructions to a tree that has been haunting her dreams. She crosses through the portal and every step of the way, she tries to find people to help her reach Bale.

However, this does not stop her from making a connection with two other boys during her journey. Kai, who never acts like he wants anything to do with her, until he plants one on her in the heat of the moment, and Jagger, the orderly from her dreams.

This novel takes the love triangle trope and gives us even more. It is apparent that Snow is looking for human connection in any form but it causes others to view her need for connection as wanting more.

I had heard many good things about her other series Dorothy Must Die, and I am now super excited to pick that one up as well, but this was an impulse buy… Just look at that cover 🙂

Quotes:

“…this boy I had known for less than a heartbeat, was the boy of my dreams. Only my dreams were nightmares.” ― Danielle PaigeStealing Snow

“I don’t know who you are. You hide your real faces from one another. How is that living? I don’t want to hide my scars, I wish I didn’t have magic and I’d rather dance with my feet on the ground! I don’t want to live in a dream- I just want to live. Like a normal person. And I want to feel things for free.” ― Danielle PaigeStealing Snow

Recommendations:

Alice in Zombieland (White Rabbit Chronicles, #1) by Gena Showalter

Red Queen (Red Queen, #1) by Victoria Aveyard

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles, #1) by Marissa Meyer

The Wrath and the Dawn (The Wrath and the Dawn, #1) by Renee Ahdieh

 
2 Comments

Posted by on September 26, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October = Horror

My favorite month/holiday is forthcoming. I am excited and ready to pursue the realm of Horror once again. This used to be the only genre I would read. My mother is a huge Stephen King fan and I grew up on the movies based on his works (excited for the It remake). I watched Tales From the Crypt, my favorite movie for years was Demon Knight (Ahh, Billy Zane), followed closely by The Craft. As a child Goosebumps (along with, Are You Afraid of the Dark?) was my go-to followed by Fear Street. When I got older, I was drawn to even darker works. That being said, I am truly difficult to scare. Now, I search and search for something even remotely capable.

Below is my list of Horror books that came close, in no particular order:

10. The Omen

226162

9. The Woman in Black

37034

8. The Ritual

10239382.jpg

7. The Best of H. P. Lovecraft

36315

6. The Child Thief

6308379

5. The Darkest Powers Series

6468666

4. Let the Right One In

943402

3. The Vanishing

498107

2. The Terror

3974

1. The Hellfire Club

65505

Again, these are in no particular order, just my top 10. I do have a young-adult series in here and I would encourage any horror fan to pick it up. There are some moments where I was even taken aback. This series played on my particular fears.

What are your favorite Horror novels? I’d love to add to my collection.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on September 11, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The 4 Books I am Always Reading

I saw a post on Book Riot with this exact title. I was intrigued and inspired. The author of the post stated the types of books she always has at hand, and I realized there are four types of books I always have on hand as well. I decided it would be fun to share my four with you.

Original post here.

1. NetGalley e-book

I read for NetGalley. This is a site where bloggers can get access to ARC’s of books and/or read and review the books shared on the site. It is a wonderful way to find new voices, get your hands on books you love early or find a way to advance your blog and the author’s reach by having advanced reviews upon release. I am always reading one and since they come in e-book, I always have it on me.

2. Audio Book

Next is my Audible listen. Audio books are the easiest way to get my reading goals in for the year. I have come across some great voices in audio books. The performances can make a huge difference. A good delivery and a great novel, there is no better combination.

3. My TBR Clean Out

I have a TBR shelf filled with books that I have yet to read. These are the books I have been longing to read for a while. Sometimes I just randomly pick one up, sometimes I follow a list.

4. Book Club Read

I run The Gothic Novel Book Club on Goodreads. We are a very active bunch and always choose two new books each month. We love all things Gothic and read everything from the most loved Classics to genuine Horror. We tend to focus on the paranormal, but all Gothic novels are up for nomination.

Some others find their way into my reads and I can be reading as many as seven books at a time, but I always have these four at hand.

Thanks for reading!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 11, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Black Prism – Brent Weeks

7165300

Synopsis:

Gavin Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace. But Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live: Seven years to achieve seven impossible goals.

But when Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he’s willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.

Copied from Goodreads

Review:

I have been a fan of Brent Weeks for some time now. His Night Angel Trilogy is one of my favorite Fantasy series. Brent Weeks is a master world builder. His vision for his worlds play out through the story. Little nuggets of lore, scene and atmosphere are dropped along the way. In this novel, we see him build a world through the eyes of an adolescent, an all-powerful mage and a military woman. He is able to bring certain nuances within the world to the forefront in each telling. THIS is how you make multiple perspective work!

I absolutely love that one of his lead characters is a fairly pudgy boy with no real understanding of the world around him. Kip is an endearing character for many reasons but making him fat and clumsy (in words and in action) make him an unexpected hero. I adore this. So many times we see the hero in a story and say to ourselves “Of course they will win. Look at what they can do.” Kip is not so easily thrown into that category.

We are given a “hero” with those qualities in Gavin, The Prism. However, Gavin is not quite what he seems to be. Early on, Weeks ensures you are drawn to Gavin, that you like him and that you believe him to be a hero of legend. However, as events unfold, you see Gavin is not quite the hero you thought he was. His story takes turn after unexpected turn throughout the course of the novel.

One other thing I loved, and honestly I don’t know how he did it so well, was his explanation of a woman going through menses. I know it seems odd to find this episode to be a favorite, but come on, he had to have a woman’s insight here. It was so well thought out and had me going “Damn, straight” that I was checking the cover to make sure I was still reading a book written by a man (not really). Weeks simply puts that much thought into his characters and I love it!!

I always love when a novel keeps me guessing until the end, however, the ending of this novel you see coming a mile away. It is foreshadowed many times throughout the course of the novel, but I was okay with this because there were so many twists and turns throughout that it didn’t matter when it came to the end. I knew it was coming and still found it enthralling to the last page.

This will be joining the ranks of my absolute favorite novels.

Quotes:

“You might want to think twice before you try to use a man’s conscience against him. It may turn out he doesn’t have one.” ― Brent WeeksThe Black Prism

“Will covers a multitude of flaws, just as love covers a multitude of sins.” ― Brent WeeksThe Black Prism

“You have to be a little bad to make history.” ― Brent WeeksThe Black Prism

“When you don’t know what to do, do what’s right and do what’s in front of you. But not necessarily what’s right in front of you.” ― Brent WeeksThe Black Prism

“At some point, you have to decide not merely what you’re going to believe, but how you’re going to believe. Are you going to believe in people, or in ideas or in Orcholam? With your heart, or with your head? Will you believe what’s in front of you, or in what you think you know? There are some things you think you know that are lies. I can’t tell you what those are, and I’m sorry for that.” ― Brent WeeksThe Black Prism

“I was a bad child. Fortunately, I’ve come a long way since then. Now I’m a bad man.” ― Brent WeeksThe Black Prism

Recommendations:

The Waking Fire (The Draconis Memoria, #1) by Anthony Ryan

The Warded Man (Demon Cycle, #1) by Peter V. Brett

Age of Myth (The Legends of the First Empire, #1) by Michael J. Sullivan

The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle, #1) by Patrick Rothfuss

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 9, 2017 in Book Reviews

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,